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CEDAR CREEK CEMETERY

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The Cedar Creek Cemetery has been deemed a Texas Historical Landmark. This land was given to my 4th great grandmother and other recently freed slaves to use for a church and a cemetery.
The Marker Reads:
This burial ground was established around 1875 to serve the African-American community of Cedar Creek. The African Methodsist Episcopalian Church, which organized in 1874, recieved this property from the estate of N.W. Faison. Members erected a church building and laid out the cemetery behind it.
The earliest known burial is of Christofer Myres, dating to 1877. Unique grave markers include one shaped into a concrete ball, one made of petrified wood, several partially made from sea shells, and an obelisk. The church served the area for more than 50 years. Today the Cedar Creek Cemetery is all that remains of the historic cedar creek community.
Copyright
April M. Frazier
Image Size
4000x4000 / 2.0MB
Contained in galleries
Passage [pas-ij] Portfolio, DOCUMENTARY OF TEXAS
The Cedar Creek Cemetery has been deemed a Texas Historical Landmark. This land was given to my 4th great grandmother and other recently freed slaves to use for a church and a cemetery. <br />
The Marker Reads: <br />
This burial ground was established around 1875 to serve the African-American community of Cedar Creek. The African Methodsist Episcopalian Church, which organized in 1874, recieved this property from the estate of N.W. Faison. Members erected a church building and laid out the cemetery behind it. <br />
The earliest known burial is of Christofer Myres, dating to 1877. Unique grave markers include one shaped into a concrete ball, one made of petrified wood, several partially made from sea shells, and an obelisk. The church served the area for more than 50 years. Today the Cedar Creek Cemetery is all that remains of the historic cedar creek community.